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brooklynmutt:

@emmersbrown: Best Wash Post correction ever?

I respectfully disagree.
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Not sure Vine is going to be a huge deal unless it resolves its video compatibility issues.

Not sure Vine is going to be a huge deal unless it resolves its video compatibility issues.

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life:

45 years ago today, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” premiered at the Uptown Theater in Washington D.C. See amazing photos from the set of the film here.
(Dmitri Kessel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Today at the Uptown: “G.I. Joe: Retaliation 3D.”

life:

45 years ago today, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” premiered at the Uptown Theater in Washington D.C. See amazing photos from the set of the film here.

(Dmitri Kessel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Today at the Uptown: “G.I. Joe: Retaliation 3D.”

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coverjunkie:


Houstonia (US)
Premier issue Houstonia magazine, looks ace all ready!Illustrator: John Patrick ThomasDesign Director: Chris Skiles Deputy Art Director: Alese Pickering Editorial Director: Scott VogelEditor in Chief: John Ashby WilburnExecutive Editor: Catherine Matusow

Houston probably isn’t even the greatest place in Houston.

coverjunkie:

Houstonia (US)

Premier issue Houstonia magazine, looks ace all ready!

Illustrator: John Patrick Thomas
Design Director: Chris Skiles 
Deputy Art Director: Alese Pickering 

Editorial Director: Scott Vogel
Editor in Chief: John Ashby Wilburn
Executive Editor: Catherine Matusow

Houston probably isn’t even the greatest place in Houston.

Link

Like an unrequited lover, Boyle had turned down Breitbart’s many advances. Still, when he died in March from a sudden heart attack, the young reporter was devastated.”

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What the what.

What the what.

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picturedept:

Tumblr Discovery
Joshua Yospyn has some great portraits from last week’s RNC convention.
(via photographyprison:)

Joshua Yospyn (@yospyn) makes portraits at the RNC.


Yospyn rises from the ashes of TBD.com.

picturedept:

Tumblr Discovery

Joshua Yospyn has some great portraits from last week’s RNC convention.

(via photographyprison:)

Joshua Yospyn (@yospyn) makes portraits at the RNC.

Yospyn rises from the ashes of TBD.com.

Text

When I try to block the trolls

newscatgif:

The first cat video I have ever enjoyed.

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motherjones:

theamericanscholar:

The Great Gatsby, in addition to the $8,397 earned in book royalties, made $6,864 for the play and $18,910 for movie rights. Read “Living on $500,000 a Year” for a surprising look at the lifestyle of Scott and Zelda.
(Photo courtesy Warner Brothers)

Here at Mother Jones, we really like digging through tax returns. Glad to see we’re not the only ones. 
F. Scott Fitzgerald was, after all, a member of the 1%.

The publication of This Side of Paradise when he was 23 immediately put Fitzgerald’s income in the top 2 percent of American taxpayers. Thereafter, for most of his working life, he earned about $24,000 a year, which put him in the top 1 percent of those filing returns. 

And this historical note is fascinating: 

Before World War II, the government did not know what anyone made. Only the wealthy and upper-middle class filed returns—less than 10 percent of the population. The system was based on what the irs called “self-assessment,” which meant that the taxpayer told the government what he or she earned the prior year and then sent a check on March 15. Some information returns were sent to the government, but the government had no capacity to match the return to the taxpayer and the returns piled up in warehouses. Not until 1962 did the government’s computer system begin to efficiently match the information returns to the taxpayer. During the 1920s and 1930s, the tax system relied almost entirely on the honesty of taxpayers. Fitzgerald reported every dollar he had entered in his ledger. He was impeccably honest in his reporting.


"The short stories were his main source of revenue." That such a time existed sounds like, well, fiction.

motherjones:

theamericanscholar:

The Great Gatsby, in addition to the $8,397 earned in book royalties, made $6,864 for the play and $18,910 for movie rights. Read “Living on $500,000 a Year” for a surprising look at the lifestyle of Scott and Zelda.

(Photo courtesy Warner Brothers)

Here at Mother Jones, we really like digging through tax returns. Glad to see we’re not the only ones. 

F. Scott Fitzgerald was, after all, a member of the 1%.

The publication of This Side of Paradise when he was 23 immediately put Fitzgerald’s income in the top 2 percent of American taxpayers. Thereafter, for most of his working life, he earned about $24,000 a year, which put him in the top 1 percent of those filing returns. 

And this historical note is fascinating: 

Before World War II, the government did not know what anyone made. Only the wealthy and upper-middle class filed returns—less than 10 percent of the population. The system was based on what the irs called “self-assessment,” which meant that the taxpayer told the government what he or she earned the prior year and then sent a check on March 15. Some information returns were sent to the government, but the government had no capacity to match the return to the taxpayer and the returns piled up in warehouses. Not until 1962 did the government’s computer system begin to efficiently match the information returns to the taxpayer. During the 1920s and 1930s, the tax system relied almost entirely on the honesty of taxpayers. Fitzgerald reported every dollar he had entered in his ledger. He was impeccably honest in his reporting.

"The short stories were his main source of revenue." That such a time existed sounds like, well, fiction.

Text

Twitter’s loss is Tumblr’s gain

twitterstatus:

Users may be experiencing issues accessing Twitter. Our engineers are currently working to resolve the issue.

Tumblr HQ is high-fiving right now.